25th Trillium Award

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Terry Fallis' Up and Down wins 2013 Forest of Reading Evergreen™ Award

From our friends at the Ontario Library Association:

Winner of 2013 Forest of Reading Evergreen™ Award announced:
Canadian readers choose the best in Canadian fiction and non-fiction

After weeks of voting, Ontarians have decided: Terry Fallis’ riveting account of the world of international public relations has won the Forest of Reading’s 2013 Evergreen™ Award.

The Book Boxes, with Evergreen-Award Nominee Donna Morrissey

The Evergreen™ Award, a division of the Ontario Library Association's (OLA) Forest of Reading® program, is presented to outstanding books in Canadian fiction and non-fiction. Adult library patrons choose the winners from nominees selected by a committee of librarians.

It would be hard to find a writer who hasn't logged a good number of hours in the local library. Whether remembered as childhood havens or appreciated as the quiet workspace in a busy life, libraries still resonate in the hearts and imaginations of writers. Today 2013 Evergreen™ Award nominee Donna Morrissey, author of The Deception of Livvy Higgs (Viking Canada), recalls the childhood wonder of the travelling library and the enduring comfort of the book stacks.

In Tribute to Public Libraries, with Evergreen-Award Nominee Terry Fallis

The Evergreen™ Award, a division of the Ontario Library Association's (OLA) Forest of Reading® program, is presented to outstanding books in Canadian fiction and non-fiction. Adult library patrons choose the winners from nominees selected by a committee of librarians.

It would be hard to find a writer who hasn't logged a good number of hours in the local library. Whether remembered as childhood havens or appreciated as the quiet workspace in a busy life, libraries still resonate in the hearts and imaginations of writers. Today 2013 Evergreen™ Award nominee and CBC Canada Reads winner Terry Fallis, author of Up and Down (McClelland & Stewart), shares how public libraries have fed his lifelong curiosity about the world around him.

The Library as Home, with Evergreen-Award Nominee Marina Endicott

The Evergreen™ Award, a division of the Ontario Library Association's (OLA) Forest of Reading® program, is presented to outstanding books in Canadian fiction and non-fiction. Adult library patrons choose the winners from nominees selected by a committee of librarians.

It would be hard to find a writer who hasn't logged a good number of hours in the local library. Whether remembered as childhood havens or appreciated as the quiet workspace in a busy life, libraries still resonate in the hearts and imaginations of writers. Today 2013 Evergreen™ Award nominee Marina Endicott, author of The Little Shadows (Doubleday Canada), reminisces about the comfort and meaning of her favourite childhood library.

Leaving for the Library, with Evergreen-Award Nominee Eva Stachniak

The Evergreen™ Award, a division of the Ontario Library Association's (OLA) Forest of Reading® program, is presented to outstanding books in Canadian fiction and non-fiction. Adult library patrons choose the winners from nominees selected by a committee of librarians.

It would be hard to find a writer who hasn't logged a good number of hours in the local library. Whether remembered as childhood havens or appreciated as the quiet workspace in a busy life, libraries still resonate in the hearts and imaginations of writers. Today 2013 Evergreen™ Award nominee Eva Stachniak, author of The Winter Palace (Doubleday Canada), was asked to share a library or library experience that has been significant to her as a reader, or as a writer, at any point in her life.

Way to May Day

Dear readers,

It saddens me to report that National Poetry Month (NaPoMo) has given way to May Day, which means that we must stop talking about poetry and consider, instead, the plight of the working class. Oh, wait, that’s us too.

Postal poetry experiment: Mabi David

We all know in our darkest heart of hearts that the end of bookstores is coming.

A few might survive, but we might not live near them. Or like them. Certainly, the poetry sections of many are looking a little sparse of late.

But, at the same time, ordering from Amazon has been demonstrated to count against your soul in the afterlife. (Each “order with one click” subtracts roughly ten points.)

Trouble in the (zeit)Geist?

The tangible rewards of being a contemporary Canadian poet are relatively few compared to the amount of effort, and, yes, hard work, it takes to be a contemporary Canadian poet.

The tangible rewards include, and are quite possibly limited to:

  • The ability to show up at the local reading series without needing to invite your friends. (There are six of them. And they are all already there.)
  • The ability to cause a kerfuffle at the border simply by stating your profession.

More Ping Pong for More Literacy

A few posts ago, I spoke with writers Jeff Latosik, Howard Akler, Elyse Friedman, and David Seymour about their ping pong team, Balls, Baby, Balls, which will compete in the Pongapalooza championship on May 8 to raise

Microphone Lessons for Poets: Part 3

If you thought we were done with the microphone lessons, I am afraid you were incorrect. There are more types of microphones, even, than types of detachable shirt front. You will never, in your short career, master them all. But, at any rate, onwards.

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