25th Trillium Award

Weekly Round-up: Open Book: Toronto

 
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Rob Laidlaw

An update of the interviews and features on Open Book: Toronto this week.

Ten Questions, with Rob Laidlaw

Rob Laidlaw says about his decision to write On Parade: “I think young people around the world are better informed about animal issues than their parents are. I also think they are far more receptive to placing the interests and wellbeing of animals as a high priority.” Read more

The Great Canadian Writer’s Craft Interview: Gregory Betts

In his interview with high-school student Emily Saunders, Gregory Betts speaks about what it means to be a Canadian poet, working with Gary Barwin and teaching at Brock University. Read more

On Writing, with Len Gasparini

Len Gasparini talks about his newest short fiction collection, The Snows of Yesteryear, telling us his stories are a mix of reality and fiction: “My characters, the incidents I describe, are partly true. For the sake of entertainment, I fictionalize the rest.” Read more

The Great Canadian Writer’s Craft Interview: Rachel Zolf

“In many ways, the book object represents the ‘death’ of the inquiry that drove it. But I still always harbour a certain fondness for each of these objects that has slithered out of me, much as it is sometimes difficult to look at them!” says Rachel Zolf in her interview with high-school student Sam Agro. Read more

On Writing: The Short Story Edition, with Anne Perdue

Anne Purdue speaks about her new book I’m a Registered Nurse Not a Whore and challenges during the writing process. She also gives us a list of her picks of perfect short stories. Read more

The Great Canadian Writer’s Craft Interview: Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

High-school student Claire Wiles speaks to Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm about performing poetry, seeking inspiration and working with emerging writers. Read more

The Great Canadian Writer’s Craft Interview: Jay MillAr

Jay MillAr speaks about page constraints, the spelling of his name and the Internet’s affect on poetry in his interview with high-school student Alexandra Gillis. Read more

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