25th Trillium Award

 

On Writing, with Daryl Sneath

All My Sins (Now Or Never Publishing), the debut novel by Daryl Sneath, is a story about guilt, false accusations, a revenge-plot and the desire to wipe the tablet clean and begin anew.

Today Open Book speaks to Daryl about the research behind his novel, what he’s working on now and gives us some insight into All My Sins’ protagonist, Ben Dunn.

Open Book:

Tell us about your book, All My Sins.

Brick Books Coast to Coast: An Interview with Jane Munro

This spring, Brick Book poets Karen Enns, Joanna Lilley, Jane Munro and Arleen Paré are embarking on a cross-Canada poetry tour, reading from their new collections to audiences coast to coast. The poets will make three stops in Ontario. You can catch their readings in Toronto on May 9, in Kingston on May 12 and in Ottawa on May 13.

FICTION CRAFT BY SHAUN SMITH, ET AL

Moving Stories

With Sebastien de Castell, Kirstin Chen, J.E. Forman, Amy Hatvany, Nancy Lee, Claire Letemendia, Jennifer McMahon, Peter Norman, Padma Viswanathan and M.D. Waters.

This month on Fiction Craft we asked a group of writers: How do you keep a plot moving forward?

At the Desk: Anna Hope

Anna Hope's debut novel, Wake (McClelland & Stewart), follows three British women dealing with devastating loss in the aftermath of WWI. As the story unfolds, the connection between the women is slowly revealed.

Today Anna joins us as part of Open Book's At The Desk series, in which writers speak about their creative processes and the workspaces that inspire them, telling the stories behind the books that sits on our shelves and in our hands.

Walrus Foundation Offers Free E-Book Download for Canada Water Week

From our friends at the Walrus Foundation

During Canada Water Week, the Walrus Foundation and the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation are releasing an ebook by award-winning journalist and author Chris Wood containing his seminal story about the Mackenzie River, “The Last Great Water Fight,” first featured in the October 2010 issue of The Walrus. The ebook also includes “Back to the Mack,” in which Wood returns to the Mackenzie four years after his original story and chronicles the natural resource developments affecting both the river and the extensive ecosystems and communities it supports.

IFOA to partner with Humber for Academic Conference & Educational Programming

From our friends at IFOA

IFOA (The International Festival of Authors) is delighted to announce a new partnership with Humber’s School of Liberal Arts & Sciences (LAS), which will see the two organizations collaborating on several public events that will bridge IFOA programming and academia.

“Working together opens new windows of opportunity, both for us and Humber LAS,” said IFOA Director Geoffrey E. Taylor. “Expanding our programming to include this academic component is something that we’ve hoped to be able to do for some time.”

Thomas King Awarded 2014 RBC Taylor Prize!

It is truly Thomas King's year — mere weeks after being awarded the BC National Non-Fiction Award, and after nominations for the Trillium Prize and Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction, he topped off his accolades with the prestigious, $25,000 RBC Taylor Prize for Non-fiction.

Canada Writes announces Finalists for the CBC Short Story Prize

From our friends at Canada Writes

Canada Writes, the CBC's online home for original writing and part of CBC Books, with its partners the Canada Council for the Arts, Air Canada's enRoute magazine and The Banff Centre, announced today the finalists for the 2014 CBC Short Story Prize. The English texts were selected from over 3,200 stories that were received from across the country.

The 5 English-language finalists are:

Jane Eaton Hamilton (Vancouver, BC) for "Smiley"
Alix Hawley (Kelowna, BC) for "Jumbo"
Laura Legge (Toronto, ON) for "Tukisiviit?"
Trent Lewin (Waterloo, ON) for "Saad Steps Out"

RBC Taylor Prize Interview Series: Thomas King

Thomas King's latest book, The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America (Doubleday Canada) is both personal and historical, hinging on the question of what it means to be "Indian" in North America. Just weeks ago, the book was awarded the prestigious BC National Non-Fiction Prize, after scooping nominations for the Hilary Weston Writer's Trust Nonfiction prize and the Trillium Award.

RBC Taylor Prize Interview Series: J.B. MacKinnon

When J.B. MacKinnon realised that the grassland where he grew up was not the unsullied wilderness he'd always considered it to be, the spark for The Once and Future World: Nature as It Was, as It Is, and as It Could Be (Random House Canada) was born. As he began to consider the long processes outdoor spaces undergo, from the disappearance of wild species to the introduction of domesticated ones, J.B.'s passion for "re-wilding" was born.

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